Institutional Review Board

"Jackson State Community College recognizes the importance of establishing an Institutional Review Board (IRB) for Human Subjects Research that is consistent with the 1974 National Research Act (Pub. L. 93-348) and that follows the ethical principles set forth by the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research in the Belmont Report1

No research is to be conducted prior to the approval of the JSCC Institutional Review Board."

Institutional Research Board Application

Institutional Review Board Documentation

"To submit an application, fax to 731/425-2647 to the attention of Sara Cooper, or email to scooper8@jscc.edu.  All applications must be completed in full before submitted."

Introduction and Basic Principles

Jackson State Community College recognizes the importance of establishing an Institutional Review Board (IRB) for Human Subjects Research that is consistent with the 1974 National Research Act (Pub. L. 93-348) and that follows the ethical principles set forth by the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research in the Belmont Report1

In the United States, IRBs are governed by Title 45 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) Part 46.  These regulations established the IRB as one mechanism through which human subjects would be protected. 

The 1978 Belmont Report identified three basic ethical principles for acceptable research involving human subjects. These principles, (1) respect for persons, (2) beneficence, and (3) justice, are now accepted as the three critical requirements for the ethical conduct of research involving human subjects.  What follows is a brief explanation of the meaning of each of these principles for governing acceptable research on human subjects:

Respect for persons involves the recognition of the personal dignity and autonomy of individuals, and includes special protection of those persons with diminished ability to make informed choices.  This principle underlies the need to obtain informed consent.

Beneficence entails an obligation to protect persons from harm by maximizing anticipated benefits and minimizing possible risks.  This principle of beneficence underlies the need to engage in a risk/benefit analysis and to minimize risks to human subjects in any proposed research project.

Justice requires that the benefits and burdens of research be distributed fairly.  The principle of justice requires that subjects be fairly selected.

1  "The Belmont Report: Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research" was released in 1978 by the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research.